Wagman Hair

6 Fastest Ways To Cause Damage Wearing Weave!

6 Ways to Cause Hair Damage Wearing Weave - Longing 4 Length Weaves can be amazing protective styles.  Aside from giving you a break from the daily maintenance of maintaining healthy hair, having your hair braided, protected and hidden from the environment is a great recipe for growth, provided you do (and not do) a few things.  These are six surefire ways to cause damage wearing weave…

Not Washing.  Some ladies are determined not to wash their hair or extensions because they fear messing up the style.  Would you skip showering for weeks at a time?  Well, your scalp is an important part of  your body and needs to be kept clean just like the rest of you! Doing so creates a better growing environment and eliminates buildup from your hair and extensions.  See ‘How to Wash Your Hair While Wearing a Sew-In Weave.’

Skipping Conditioner.  Not only will conditioning keep your hair healthy beneath the weave, but it also aids in the take down process as well.  Dry, brittle hair is prone to breakage and matting but hair that is supple but strong from proper care will make the weave removal process a breeze.

Constant heat.  While on your quest for the perfect “blend” of your leave out with the texture of your weave, remember not to cause breakage or heat damage from constant straightening!  Instead try using heat free methods such as rollersetting – use a couple of magnetic rollers to straighten and smooth or rods to curl.  See How to Rollerset Your Hair While Wearing Weave.

Not moisturizing.  Though your scalp’s natural sebum aids in moisturizing your real hair, you should still spray your favorite moisturizing spritz or leave-in conditioner between the tracks of your weave a few times per week to prevent breakage. See How to Moisturize Under a Weave.

Avoid Damage While Wearing Weave - Longing 4 Length - EbonyCPrincess

Full Sew In Weave Hairstyle

Too much tension.  Beware of stylists who believe the tighter the weave, the better!  You should never experience pain, breakouts along your hairline or difficulty moving your head or blinking your eyes after getting a sew-in.  If you see your scalp being pulled, folded or break out in tiny bumps, the braids and/or sewing  is much too tight.   Please speak up immediately!  Too much tension on your hair will absolutely cause breakage and may even lead to traction alopecia. See Get a Tension Free Weave.

Leaving it in too long.  I recommend wearing your sew-in weave for 8 weeks maximum and hair with tighter curl patterns may need removal a bit sooner.  Your hair has undergone a bit of swelling and condensing while braided from washing, conditioning, moisturizing, sweating, etc.  If left in too long, your hair will begin to tangle and matte, making the take-down difficult and prone to breakage.  Also, as your hair grows away from your scalp, the weight of the extensions will begin to pull on your hair.  Although it may be a pricey process, taking your weave down every 6-8 weeks will ensure your hair stays healthy. See How Long Should You Wear Protective Styles.

As I said, weaves can be an amazing style option allowing your hair to rest and grow (if that is your goal).  But it is important to avoid these pitfalls, otherwise you will cause breakage and damage wearing weaves, which completely defeats the purpose!

Ebony C. Princess About Ebony C. Princess

A self proclaimed hair enthusiast and healthy hair advocate, Ebony C, Princess is the chief editor of Longing 4 Length. She shares her personal journey towards growing long, healthy hair while providing hair care tips and information.

  • http://www.myhealthyhairdiary.blogspot.com/ Healthy Hair Diary

    Great tips :) …………. I ask ppl the same question when they tell me they don’t wash their hair for weeks lol they surly get the point after that

  • Stella Jackson

    This is a great article, I wear weave 90% of time and most people don’t understand the importance of washing their hair. I pretty much do everything you mentioned and my hair is alot healthier.

  • blutifulblaq

    Thanks for these tips. I will be getting my first sew-in next Thursday and these tips come in handy.